Sunday, April 16, 2017

Sharing our IDEAS!

This is an exciting time in the capstone research process!  You have gathered and collected resources, done research, and are close or have answered your question.  Now it is time to:

THINK ABOUT SHARING YOUR LEARNING!?!
BE CREATIVE!
BE INNOVATIVE!
Do something that you are going to enjoy making and sharing!
Think about your project—what you share should be connected to your question.
At the end of the project our goal for you is to have something you are proud of!
Today is about planning your project.  You are not limited to these ideas, but they might help you to get started!  Don't be afraid to try a new tool either! AND, you can combine ideas or have two parts to your project.



Tuesday, April 4, 2017

Organizing Your Capstone Claims and Notes to Answer your Research Question

Today we are going to work on organizing the information you will include in your Capstone presentations. You will be reading through your notes, deciding on Claims that help answer your research question, and organizing your notes under your Claims. These organized Claims and notes will be the content of your presentation.

Steps for Organizing Your Claims and Notes

Friday, February 24, 2017

Taking Notes from Videos, Audio Recordings, Interviews, and Websites







The steps for taking notes from a print source, like a book or a website, are:

How to take notes from print
  • Read a section of text
  • Think about the new information until it makes sense
  • Ask yourself, “Does this information help answer my research question?”
  • Connect new information with what you knew before
  • Write down the important words

Use the same strategies for other sources:



How to take notes from an interview
(it's a great idea to video or audio record
an interview so you can go back and listen later)
  • Ask one question at a time
  • Think about the answer until it makes sense (you may need to ask a follow up question)
  • Ask yourself, “Does this information help answer my research question?”
  • Connect new information with what you knew before
  • Write down the important words


How to take notes from a video or audio recording
  • If it's less than 5 minutes, watch or listen to the whole recording one time
  • Go back to the beginning and watch or listen to a section
  • PAUSE THE RECORDING! Think about the new information until it makes sense
  • Ask yourself, “Does this information help answer my research question?”
  • Connect new information with what you knew before
  • Write down the important words

Monday, February 20, 2017

Fourth Grade Capstone Project Research Questions #resvt #geniushour #vted




RES fourth graders have been working on their interest-based Capstone Projects, and they have each developed a research question they will use to focus their investigations. We are so impressed by the thoughtfulness of the questions! Our students have a great breadth of interests, and we can't wait to see the results of their research!

-Mrs. Rankin and Mrs. Redford

How do guitars, drums, and pianos make sounds?
  • How do architects make their plans?
  • How do things get their names?
  • World War II: What was it like at home during that time period?
  • How do people create good doodles?
  • How do people get evidence of monsters?
  • Why would someone make an instrument?
  • How are coral reefs made?
  • How did World War II submarines work?
  • How did the Battle of the Bulge happen?
  • How do inventors come up with inventions?
  • How are cows treated from birth to death?
  • How will cars look in the future?
  • How are electronic games made?
  • How do different deep sea creatures survive?
  • Why did some people join Hitler?
  • What features make supercars so fast?
  • How did they make Bugattis so fast?
  • What makes an animal a rodent?
  • How is a black hole formed?
  • How do computers work?
  • How do you care for and train a bunny?
  • How do people use drones for photography?
  • How do we remember things?
  • What is the history of ballet?
  • What is the history of horseback riding?
  • How do magicians do tricks?
  • How do you choreograph a dance?
  • How did the Civil War start?
  • How are stop motion movies made?
  • How do you a code a video game?
  • How do you build a treehouse?
  • How did Harry Houdini do his magic tricks?
  • Why do volcanoes erupt?
  • How is time and space the same thing?
  • How do artists make different clay pots?
  • How did women's clothing in the 1900s develop over time?
  • How do you make a cartoon?

Friday, February 10, 2017

Capstone Projects: Taking Notes

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-naDOkRO6Zgk/UVwpu8IVRRI/AAAAAAAACCo/uDVojpqpxcA/s640/blogger-image--1742877747.jpg

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-aRyfjvGTscU/UVwpvNpaXFI/AAAAAAAACCs/KcJtNsZlH-k/s640/blogger-image-1111854267.jpg




How to take notes
  • Read a section of text
  • Think about the new information until it makes sense
  • Ask yourself, “Does this information help answer my research question?”
  • Connect new information with what you knew before
  • Write down the important words



Fact Fragment Frenzy (Click on Demo)


Adapted from Grade 4 Writing Workshop model by Calkins and Cockerille. Bringing History to Life. Heinemann, 2013.

Sunday, February 5, 2017

How to Turn a Good Topic into a Great Research Question #resvt #vsla



The next step in our fourth grade enrichment library classes is for the scholars to create research questions for their Capstone Projects. Scholars will start by asking themselves, What do I already know about my topic? And what am I curious about?



A good research question:

1) Needs information from sources other than yourself

2) Can be researched—you can find information to help you answer it

3) Broad enough for you to learn a lot about your topic - a Yard Question, not an Inch or Foot Question

4) Narrow enough to answer in three or four classes of research - a Yard question, not a Mile Question that would take forever to answer!

5) often (not always) begins with “why” or “how”

6) clearly worded

7) encourages deeper understanding of the topic

8) you want to know the answer!




Thursday, January 26, 2017

Book Trailers from Ms. Senning's Class #resvt #vsla #vted

Fourth graders at RES are wrapping up a unit on media literacy. They learned about several strategies that advertisers use to get people's attention and convince them to buy products. Then they practiced finding those strategies in different kinds of advertisements. Finally, the scholars created video advertisements for books, also known as book trailers, to try to convince other scholars to read their favorite stories.

We hope you enjoy the book trailers! Can you identify some of the strategies used by our scholars? They may include Association, Bandwagon, Beautiful People, Bribery, Celebrity Endorsements, Experts, Explicit Claims, Fear, Humor, Intensity, Maybe/Weasel Words, Plain Folks, Testimonials, Repetition, and Warm and Fuzzy.

We share all our scholars' book trailers on YouTube and Twitter. Sometimes we hear back from authors that they liked the trailers! We have added those mentions below the videos.










S.S. Taylor, the Author of The Expeditioners, liked this book trailer on Twitter!











The author of Life of Ty, Lauren Myracle liked this book trailer on Twitter!








Dan Gutman, the author of Never Say Genius, complimented this book trailer on Twitter!




Book Trailers from Mrs. LeFrancois' Class #resvt #vsla #vted

Fourth graders at RES are wrapping up a unit on media literacy. They learned about several strategies that advertisers use to get people's attention and convince them to buy products. Then they practiced finding those strategies in different kinds of advertisements. Finally, the scholars created video advertisements for books, also known as book trailers, to try to convince other scholars to read their favorite stories.

We hope you enjoy the book trailers! Can you identify some of the strategies used by our scholars? They may include Association, Bandwagon, Beautiful People, Bribery, Celebrity Endorsements, Experts, Explicit Claims, Fear, Humor, Intensity, Maybe/Weasel Words, Plain Folks, Testimonials, Repetition, and Warm and Fuzzy.

We share all our scholars' book trailers on YouTube and Twitter. Sometimes we hear back from authors that they liked the trailers! We have added those mentions below the videos.












Laurie Keller, the author of Arnie the Doughnut, liked this book trailer on Twitter!












Book Trailers from Mrs. Berliner's Class #resvt #vsla #vted

Fourth graders at RES are wrapping up a unit on media literacy. They learned about several strategies that advertisers use to get people's attention and convince them to buy products. Then they practiced finding those strategies in different kinds of advertisements. Finally, the scholars created video advertisements for books, also known as book trailers, to try to convince other scholars to read their favorite stories.

We hope you enjoy the book trailers! Can you identify some of the strategies used by our scholars? They may include Association, Bandwagon, Beautiful People, Bribery, Celebrity Endorsements, Experts, Explicit Claims, Fear, Humor, Intensity, Maybe/Weasel Words, Plain Folks, Testimonials, Repetition, and Warm and Fuzzy.

We share all our scholars' book trailers on YouTube and Twitter. Sometimes we hear back from authors that they liked the trailers! We have added those mentions below the videos.












The author of Roller Girl, Victoria Jamieson, liked this book trailer on Twitter!








The author of Awkward, Svetlana Chmakova, liked this book trailer on Twitter!









The author of this book, Lauren Tarshis, complimented this book trailer on Twitter!



The author of this book, Dana Simpson, complimented this book trailer on Twitter!







Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Capstone Project Introduction #resvt #vsla #vted


Fourth graders are beginning Capstone Projects in their Enrichment  Library classes. They will be spending the next five months working on these individual research projects on topics they choose themselves. The scholars will be completing the following steps as they learn and present their new knowledge:

  • Choose a topic
  • Choose a research question
  • Research and take notes
  • Choose how to present your research findings 
  • Create your presentation to share your research findings
  • Evaluate your presentation with a rubric





Here's a presentation we viewed with the scholars about the Capstone process. We look forward to sharing more about these projects as the spring goes on!



The Quest for Learning Video

Examples of Capstone Projects from previous years
Erickson Capstone Projects 2015
Berliner Capstone Projects 2015 
Senning Capstone Projects 2015 




capstone image from Ceridwen. "Gwal-y-filiast Capstone." Wikimedia.org. Wikimedia Commons, 5 Mar. 2011. Web. 22 Aug. 2012.